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  • In addition to calpain I

    2023-01-24

    In addition to calpain I activity, cathepsin activities have been proven to be linked to apoptotic signaling. Cathepsin B and cathepsin D are two of the most abundant and well-investigated lysosome acid-dependent proteases that are involved in the apoptotic regulation (Ferri & Kroemer, 2001). Cathepsin B and cathepsin D activities increase gradually with the extension of postmortem time, because cathepsin is a protease that exists in lysosome. It could not be fully released from lysosome at early postmortem aging. Postmortem aging can rupture the lysosome membrane and lead to the increment of cathepsin activities of LT muscles. Moreover, the lysosome membrane could rupture completely at 14 d postmortem aging (O'Halloran, Troy, Buckley & Reville, 1997). The results were consistent with those reported by Raquel, María & Patricia (2016) who found that cathepsin activity induces the release of apoptotic proteins, such as AIF, and induces the caspase-dependent or caspase-independent cell apoptosis. Furthermore, a viewpoint exists on the research on lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, wherein lysosomal cathepsin activity changes induce the release of AIF, leading to apoptosis (Kirkegaard & Jäättelä, 2009). Lysosomal cathepsins are readily released from the lysosomal membrane and mediate apoptosis in response to various stimuli. Lysosomal cathepsins could function as upstream events of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, that is, cathepsins favor the release of mitochondrial apoptosis factors (such as AIF) to the cytoplasm. Combining the results, cathepsins activation is one of the factor that influences the AIF release. However, to fully elucidate the regulation mechanisms of cathepsins, further study is necessary to investigate the relationship between cathepsin and AIF-mediated apoptosis.
    Conclusion In summary, the results of the present study indicated that AIF released from Darunavir Ethanolate to the nucleus of bovine LT muscle mediate nucleus apoptosis during postmortem aging, and caspase inhibitor prevents the release of AIF. Moreover, mitochondrial swelling, cellular ROS content, cellular Ca2+ concentration, cathepsin B and cathepsin D activities increases but calpain I activity decreases during postmortem aging. The above results demonstrated that the mitochondrial apoptotic protein AIF-mediated caspase-dependent apoptosis process of bovine LT muscle occurs during postmortem aging. Increased mitochondrial swelling, cellular ROS content and Ca2+ concentration, as well as activated calpain I and cathepsins, are necessary for AIF release during postmortem aging.
    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common and fetal malignancy, with about 1.2 million new cases and 0.6 million deaths worldwide each year [1], posing a serious threat to human health. In the United States, the incidence of CRC ranks third among various malignances, and the mortality ranks second in males and third in females [2]. In China, approximately 376,300 patients were diagnosed with CRC and an estimated 191,000 patients died from this cancer in 2015 [3], exhibiting a significant rise compared with the statistical data from 2012 [4]. Thus, continued research to understand the mechanisms underlying CRC development and progression is essential. Mitochondria are the major sites of energy generation and produce the majority of ATP in mammalian cells. These organelles also participate in a multitude of other essential physiological functions including integration of metabolic pathways, biosynthesis of metabolites, regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, and integration and execution of apoptosis [5]. Both mitochondrial DNA-encoded and nuclear DNA-encoded proteins are involved in the normal functions of mitochondria. Thus, mitochondrial functions can be affected by abnormalities in mtDNA and in nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins. Abnormalities in mtDNA, including mutations and reductions, have been supposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of many common diseases such as mitochondrial myopathies, aging, neurodegenerative disorders and cancer [6,7]. MtDNA abnormalities, including point mutations and reductions, have been reported in many human cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma, prostate cancer and breast cancer [8,9,10]. Colorectal cancer also exhibits mtDNA abnormalities such as point mutations, reductions and mitochondrial microsatellite in-stability, which may affect mitochondrial functions and result in mitochondrial dysfunctions [11,12,13].